UPDATE: Jury deadlocked, Cannon gets life in prison for slaying of SPD officer

Crime

UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/24/19) Grover Cannon has been sentenced to life in prison for the 2015 slaying of 29-year-old Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley, after deciding they were unable to come to unanimous agreement on the death penalty.

The same jury unanimously convicted Cannon, 31, of first-degree murder in the officer’s death on Wednesday. On Saturday, they deliberated for just one hour before returning to tell the judge they were deadlocked.

“Is it your belief that any further deliberation would be helpful?” asked Caddo District Judge Ramona Emanuel.

“We do not,” answered the jury’s foreman.

As with the requirement in death penalty cases that a jury must agree unanimously to convict, the jury also had to agree unanimously on the death sentence. Because they could not come to a unanimous agreement, Cannon was automatically sentenced to life in prison.

Cannon appeared relieved at the sentencing verdict, smiling as he stood with his defense team. Defense attorney Dwight Doskey said it was the outcome they wanted and that they are thankful to have avoided the death penalty.

“It was a difficult case for everybody concerned because we all realize the mental impairments that affected both the defendant, it affected his ability to let us put on the right defense for him,” said Doskey.

Family members and friends were emotional following the verdict but said they were thankful for the closure and felt that that justice has been served.

“I’m glad it’s over. It’s been a long time,” said LaValley’s mother, Jackie. “He’s not going to be able to get out and kill someone else, which I feel like he would have done if he was out in the public.” But, she added, “I will always grieve for Thomas and for what could have been. To lose a child, even, but to lose him that way. And alone. That’s what really hurts.”

“Life or death, he’s still gonna die behind bars,” said friend Chris Redford. “And he’ll never see the light of day and I think that’s what ultimately is the goal. To make sure the monster never gets out.”

The verdict came after a three-day penalty phase of the trial in which they heard witness testimony and were presented with evidence from both the defense and the prosecution as each side made their case for whether Cannon should be sentenced to life in prison without parole or death by lethal injection.

Officer Thomas LaValley was killed while responding to a report of a suspicious person call at the home of Grover Cannon’s sister in the 3500 block of Del Rio Street in the Queensborough neighborhood on August 5, 2015. (Photo: LaValley family)

Officer LaValley was shot while responding to a report of a suspicious person at the home of Cannon’s sister, Latauria Cannon, in the 3500 block of Del Rio Street in the Queensborough neighborhood.

In what is essentially a second trial before the same jury, the defense and prosecution spent the past three days presenting witnesses and evidence as each makes their case for whether Cannon should be sentenced to life in prison without parole or death by lethal injection.

During closing arguments, lead prosecutor Ed Blewer thanked the jury – which was drawn in Baton Rouge and bussed into Caddo Parish for the trial – for their sacrifice and enduring the emotional trauma associated with this process. Blewer spoke of the level of proof needed to consider the death penalty.

“We can be absolutely sure Grover Cannon committed this murder. It’s crystal clear.”

Blewer pointed to witness testimony that said Cannon knew the difference between right and wrong when he executed Thomas LaValley, who was a person, not just a “figure.” Thomas, Blewer said, was a friend and a brother, “dedicated to protecting the many people here in Shreveport.” The lead prosecutor also told the jury that LaValley’s murder effectively ended his mother, Jackie’s life, as well.

“Grover Cannon is dangerous, he’s paranoid, he’s a coldblooded killer,” Blewer told the jury. “He is completely without remorse.”

Defense attorney Dwight Doskey reminded the jurors that each of them now held the power of life in their own individual hands and talked about how to honor a police officer, as has been done for LaValley with a public memorial and the renaming of a bridge.

“What you don’t do is kill in honor of Thomas LaValley,” said Doskey, maintaining that Cannon did not have the mental capacity to react properly in the situation because his mother drank while she was pregnant with him, resulting in brain damage caused by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. “We don’t get to choose our parents,” Doskey asserted to the jury.

“He was dangerous. He is in a structured environment now. He’s in prison,” appealing to jurors to sentence Cannon to life in prison.

“This is not a guilt trip, this is a responsibility trip.”

In rebuttal, prosecutor Bill Edwards countered with a reminder that choosing the death penalty would not be tantamount to taking a life in the same way Cannon did to LaValley.

“This is not a killing, this is not murder. This is giving a just verdict for a crime.”

In addition to testimony from LaValley’s mother, former co-workers, and friends, the jury has heard from Cannon’s mother, sister, and brother, as well as psychiatrists and mental health experts. Cannon’s defense team spent most of the past two days reviewing Cannon’s childhood trauma and mental state, making the case that he suffers from mental delusions, paranoia, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

A psychologist who took the stand for the defense Saturday testified that brain damage from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder doesn’t excuse Cannon’s conduct, but helps explain it. While asserting that Cannon knew shooting a police officer was wrong, the psychologist explained that FASD causes brain damage that can lead to crime and school records showing his performance at an early age provided evidence of that kind of brain damage.

On cross-examination, the state pointed out that the psychiatrist is not neurologist or neuropsychologist, and therefore not qualified to interpret the assessments performed on Cannon.

Cannon’s brother was the last to testify in his brother’s defense early Saturday afternoon. Ira Cannon, who is 10 years into an 18-year sentence of his own, took the stand in handcuffs and an inmate jumpsuit. Hed told the jury he hadn’t seen his brother since 2007 because each of them has been in and out of jail over the years.

Asked by his brother’s defense attorney to share memories of their childhoods, Ira Cannon recounted the death of their older brother and their grandmother and described Grover as a “big brother figure to him.” He also recounted the time he was hit by a car, in pain and suffering broken bones, and how Grover squeezed his hand and told him to wake up.

“He showed the love he had for me,” Ira Cannon said.

For now, Grover Cannon remains in the custody of the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office until he can be formally sentenced on January 2. From there, he will be sent to the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola where he will begin serving his sentence of life at hard labor without the benefit of parole.


SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS 4:45 PM) – The mother of convicted cop-killer Grover Cannon testified in the penalty phase of his capital murder trial Thursday, telling the jury that she drank every weekend when she was pregnant with him. Ramona Cannon also told the jury she did drink beer and use crack throughout her pregnancies with her other children.

The jury that convicted Cannon Wednesday night of first-degree murder in LaValley’s slaying is now hearing testimony that they will consider in deciding whether Cannon gets life or death.

Ramona Cannon shared pictures from her son’s childhood, calling him “little Grover” as jurors perused a family album that included photos of Cannon as baby and young child.

Grover himself testified earlier in the afternoon, insisting that he had left the Del Rio Street home where Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley was fatally shot in August 2015.

“I was wrongly convicted of a murder I did not commit,” Cannon said from the defense table after insisting on testifying on his own behalf and against his attorney’s advice. Expressing concern that Cannon is dangerous, the state asked the judge to require Cannon to testify from the defense table first, with the jury removed from the courtroom.

Grover Cannon, 31, was convicted Wednesday of first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley while he was responding to a suspicious persons call in August 2015. (Photo: Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office)

Cannon went on to say that “They (his family) didn’t know who came and went that night,” referring to video evidence during the guilt phase of the trial from his mother and sister that showed both telling police on the night of the murder that Cannon had been at the home threatening violence. Both Cannon’s sister and mother went on to testify that they did not recall telling officers of Cannon’s threats that night, in spite of those videos.

Cannon also said family loves him too, so he understands “what LaValley’s family and friends are going through.”

Following that initial testimony without the jury in the room, Judge Ramona Emanuel allowed Cannon to testify before the jury from the defense table.

Testifying before the jury, Cannon’s attorney Dwight Doskey asked him what he had to say to the jury, allowing Cannon to read a statement in his defense that said he left the Del Rio home before the shooting on foot, caught a ride with an acquaintance known to him only by the initials J.G., who drove him to Derrick Magee’s house, and Derrick Magee drove him to Grover Owen’s’ house.

Grover Owens died last year from a heart attack. No evidence was presented during the guilt phase of the trial that corroborated Cannon’s alibi.

The convicted killer’s testimony came after a former jailer at the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office took the stand and told the jury about the time Cannon threw a milk carton full of urine on him when he tried to deliver the inmate a food tray, hitting him in the mouth, face, and shoulders. Robert Owen recounted how Cannon did not want to receive the tray in the order they were stacked but demanded the tray from the bottom.

Blood tests confirmed that Cannon was positive for Hepatitis C. Owen was treated for eight months following the incident. He has not tested positive for the disease.

The penalty phase of the trial began late Thursday morning with several witnesses testifying on behalf of the state about Thomas LaValley’s life and the impact of his loss.

His mother, Jackie LaValley, was the first to take stand late Thursday morning in the penalty phase, tearfully testifying for 11 minutes about her son’s life and death. She showed photos of him at age five, as well as with her at his graduation at Northwestern and a photo of her with Thomas and his little brother Alex when Thomas graduated first in his class at the Shreveport Police Academy. She also shared a photo taken with him the last time she saw him, which was at a friend’s wedding in July 2015.

Reading from a statement she wrote for the jury, Jackie LaValley talked about how she wasn’t allowed to see Thomas the night he died, and the guilt she feels.

“A mother is supposed to protect her children and I feel like I wasn’t able to protect Thomas,” LaValley said. “Images still play in my head of his death every night.”

The grieving mother also said she prays “to be taken every night just to be with Thomas again.”

Thomas LaValley’s aunt Joy also took the stand, calling him a “miracle baby” because his mother could never conceive before him. She described her late nephew as respectful, ambitious, and intelligent. She was followed on the stand by several of the fallen officer’s friends and co-workers. All shared memories of Thomas and how his death affected them.

There were a mix of tears and smiles during Thursday’s testimony, including from the occasional juror, as loved ones recounted bittersweet memories of Thomas’ wry sense of humor, love of food and incredible kindness.

When court resumed following an afternoon recess, the state entered Cannon’s arrest record into evidence, highlighting a lengthy history of burglary charges. Cannon’s mother, Ramona, is also expected to testify.

The penalty phase is essentially a second trial before the same jury in which the defense and prosecution will present evidence and witness testimony as each side makes their case for life in prison without the possibility of parole or the death penalty. As with the requirement in death penalty cases that a jury must agree unanimously to convict, so must the jury agree unanimously on the death sentence. Otherwise, Cannon will automatically receive a life sentence.

Family members of both the victim and the offender can be called to the stand to testify, as well as expert witnesses and mitigation experts, who the state and defense will use to argue whether Cannon will receive the death penalty or the lesser penalty of life in prison.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/21/19 9:15 AM) The mother of the Shreveport police officer who was shot and killed by Grover Cannon in August 2015 took the stand Thursday morning in the penalty phase of Cannon’s trial.

The jury that convicted Cannon Wednesday night of first-degree murder in the slaying of Officer Thomas LaValley is hearing testimony that they will consider in deciding whether Cannon gets life or death as the penalty phase of the capital murder trial gets underway.

Grover Cannon, 31, was convicted Wednesday of first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley while he was responding to a suspicious persons call in August 2015. (Photo: Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office)

On the stand, Jackie LaValley tearfully testified for 11 minutes about her son’s life and the impact of his loss. She showed photos of him at age five, as well as with her at his graduation at Northwestern and a photo of her with Thomas and his little brother Alex when Thomas graduated first in his class at the Shreveport Police Academy. She also shared a photo taken with him the last time she saw him, which was at a friend’s wedding in July 2015.

Thomas LaValley’s sister, Joy, also took the stand, followed by several of the fallen officer’s friends and co-workers. All shared memories of Thomas and how his death affected them.

The penalty phase is essentially a second trial before the same jury in which the defense and prosecution will present evidence and witness testimony as each side makes their case for life in prison without the possibility of parole or the death penalty. As with the requirement in death penalty cases that a jury must agree unanimously to convict, so must the jury agree unanimously on the death sentence. Otherwise, Cannon will automatically receive a life sentence.

Family members of both the victim and the offender can be called to the stand to testify, as well as expert witnesses and mitigation experts, who the state and defense will use to argue whether Cannon will receive the death penalty or the lesser penalty of life in prison.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/21/19) A jury has found Grover Cannon guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley.

Cannon, 31, was charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of the 29-year-old Shreveport police officer on August 5, 2015. Officer LaValley was shot while responding to a report of a suspicious person at the home of Cannon’s sister, Latauria Cannon, in the 3500 block of Del Rio Street in the Queensborough neighborhood.

The jury deliberated for just two hours before returning with the verdict just before 9 p.m. on the seventh day of the trial and less than 20 minutes after returning to the courtroom to ask the judge to review the definitions of first-degree, second-degree, and manslaughter. Shortly after returning to deliberations, the jury notified the court that a verdict had been reached.

When the verdict was read, Cannon showed no reaction. While there was a generally subdued reaction from family and friends of the slain police officer, some could be heard sobbing.

Cannon now faces the death penalty in the punishment phase of the trial, which is set to get underway Thursday morning.

After a 40-minute closing argument from the state, followed by defense closing arguments that lasted just under an hour and a 33-minute rebuttal by the state, Judge Ramona Emanuel gave instructions to the jury around 6:30 p.m. The jury, which is made up of four females, two black, two white; and eight males, three black, five white, began deliberations just before 7 p.m.

Closing arguments got underway just after 4 p.m. Wednesday following testimony from Cannon, who was the only witness to take the stand in his defense. By contrast, the state called nearly 30 witnesses in the process of presenting its case. The prosecution rested its case Tuesday afternoon.

Lead prosecutor Ed Blewer started closing arguments Wednesday afternoon by telling the jury, “Grover Cannon is clearly remorseless based on the testimony you heard today. Grover Cannon disrespected you by coming in here and lying, lying, lying and lying to you.”

Blewer said Cannon executed LaValley while the officer lay shot, bleeding and calling for help, adding that “Grover Cannon executed Thomas with his own gun.”

The lead defense attorney, Dwight Doskey, started his arguments by calling the prosecution’s arguments “very powerful” and said LaValley’s heart was in the right place but was impetuous for going in without backup.

Doskey told the jury “This is a young black man accused of killing a young white officer,” adding that case could be self-defense if Cannon had been inside the house when LaValley entered. “Maybe all you see is a white guy entering your family house with a gun telling you to show your hands.”

While the defense gave their closing arguments, a LaValley family friend covered her ears and bowed her head to block out the defense going back through the killing of LaValley.

Closing arguments came after Cannon took the stand earlier Thursday morning, denying he shot and killed Officer LaValley. Cannon said he is being “blamed and framed” for something he didn’t do and that all the witnesses who testified in the state’s case – even the pathologist who did the autopsy on LaValley – lied.

Due to an earlier ruling that allowed him to conduct his own defense with the assistance of the Capital Defense Project, Cannon opted to take the stand in his own defense. Dwight Doskey, lead defense attorney, told the jury that Cannon was testifying over the objections of the capital defense team, and offered that the questions were written by Cannon.

Those questions gave Cannon the opportunity to claim that he wasn’t in the house when Officer LaValley was slain, nor did he shoot Darren Williams three weeks earlier.

Cannon detailed the day of LaValley’s death, admitting he went to his sister Latauria Cannon’s house to do his laundry but said he left before LaValley was killed. 

He admitted his sister, along with her live-boyfriend, Edward Flakes; their then 7-year old son; his mother, Ramona Cannon; and neighbor Nichelle, all of whom testified, were in the house while he was there that day, but claimed his mother, sister and Flake all lied when they said he threatened to kill them.

Cannon said he saw the video of his mother’s and sister’s interview with police on the night LaValley died, which was shown in open court Monday afternoon during testimony by SPD Sgt. Shawn Hinderburger, who conducted the interviews, but said they were lying and were trying to “clear things up” now.

Cannon said he had become angry with his mother because she was standing over his food, but did not threaten her. He said he told her when he was incarcerated in Texas, he had an issue with food, because homosexuals “were playing with food.”

He said he did not have a gun, nor did he have one since he returned from prison in March, and that the state trooper who searched him after his arrest in a shed where he was hiding on Jackson Street lied about finding two bullets in his pants pocket. In addition, Cannon said the police officer, who found the 9mm handgun in the shed where he was captured planted it there. 

Cannon also denied shooting bail bondsman Darren Williams with the same 9 mm gun a forensic examiner had testified was used to shoot LaValley at least once and claimed to know nothing about LaValley’s service weapon, which is believed to have been used to fire the additional multiple shots that ultimately killed him.

He said he heard the police-issued Glock was missing and said he thinks one of LaValley’s “co-workers” killed him. Cannon also said Larry Clarkson, who testified he saw Cannon open fire on Williams, lied. 

In the state’s cross-examination, Caddo Assistant District Attorney Ed Blewer asked Cannon if he shot Darren Williams, and Cannon answered “No.” Then Blewer said, “So Derrick Williams and Larry Clarkson lied?” “Yes,” Cannon replied.

Prosecutors spent the previous six days laying out the state’s case, wrapping up Tuesday with evidence and testimony tying bullet casings found at the scene to a gun police say Grover Cannon used in another shooting less than a month before.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/20/19) Accused cop-killer Grover Cannon took the stand today, testifying that he is being “blamed and framed” for something he didn’t do.

Cannon, 31, is charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley on August 5, 2015. Officer LaValley was killed while responding to a report of a suspicious person at the home of Cannon’s sister, Latauria Cannon, in the 3500 block of Del Rio Street in the Queensborough neighborhood.

Cannon is accused in the August 5, 2015, death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley. (Source: LaValley family)

Due to an earlier ruling that allowed him to conduct his own defense with the assistance of the Capital Defense Project, Cannon opted to take the stand in his own defense. Dwight Doskey, lead defense attorney, told the jury that Cannon was testifying over the objections of the capital defense team, and offered that the questions were written by Cannon.

On the stand for about 48 minutes, Cannon testified that all the witnesses who testified in the state’s case lied. He then launched into questions that allowed Cannon to claim that he wasn’t in the house when Officer LaValley was slain, nor did he shoot Darren Williams three weeks earlier.

Cannon’s testimony comes on the first day of the defense presenting its case and in the seventh day of the trial. Prosecutors spent the previous six days laying out the state’s case, wrapping up Tuesday with evidence and testimony tying bullet casings found at the scene to a gun police say Grover Cannon used in another shooting less than a month before.

Cannon faces the death penalty if convicted.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/20/19) The state has rested its case with testimony and evidence tying bullet casings found at the scene to a gun police say Grover Cannon used another shooting less than a month before.

Cannon, 31, is on trial for first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of SPD Officer Thomas LaValley in August 2015.

On the stand Tuesday afternoon, forensic firearms examiner Carla White testified that a .9mm cartridge found at the LaValley crime scene came from the same weapon used to shoot Darren Williams on July 15. Williams was shot three times, but survived and later identified Cannon as the gunman. A second-degree attempted murder warrant was issued for Cannon’s arrest on July 23, just 12 days before Thomas LaValley was shot and killed inside Cannon’s sister’s home. While that case is still pending, Williams testified Monday at Cannon’s trial.

Police say they found a .9mm handgun inside the shed where Cannon was discovered hiding before his arrest 18 hours after and a few blocks away from the scene of LaValley’s murder.

White also testified that all the other casings found at the scene, including the bullet that killed him, were from a .40mm Glock handgun, likely LaValley’s service weapon, which has never been found.

As the trial entered its sixth day, jurors heard from SPD Sgt. Shawn Hindenberger, who testified about his interviews with Cannon’s mother and sister from the night of the officer’s murder. Over defense objections, the judge allowed the state to play portions of those interviews, which contradicted their testimony in open court on Sunday. In that video, Cannon’s sister Latauria described the family’s fear of Cannon, saying earlier that day that Cannon even rapped, “B**** I’ll kill you, shoot you in the face.” On Sunday, Lautauria Cannon testified that she did not remember her brother making threats.

The defense is expected to begin presenting its case on Wednesday morning. There is no word yet on whether Cannon will take the stand in his own defense.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL) – (11/17/19) After losing the morning to issues with the jury, testimony resumed yesterday afternoon (11/16/19) in the first-degree murder trial of accused cop killer Grover Cannon.

Cannon is accused in the August 2015 death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley, during a suspicious person call in the 3700 block of Del Rio.

Grover Cannon

The state called SPD Sgt. Tracy Mendels, one of the crime scene investigators who investigated the crime scene where LaValley died, called back to the witness stand to continue her testimony, which began Friday and lasted about four hours.

Using photographs and diagrams of the crime scene, Mendels outlined the shell casings found, their trajectory and conclusions derived from the location of the bullet holes found inside the house.

This afternoon, that testimony continued, for almost three hours before the defense began their cross examination, which was a just over an hour long.

Mendels testified there were 14 casings from a 40.cal gun consistent with LaValley’s service weapon and one 9 mm shell casing found at the scene.

Although Dr. James Traylor, pathologist who performed the autopsy on LaValley at LSU Health Sciences Center was waiting in the wings to testify, presiding Judge Ramona Emanuel and attorneys met and decided to recess just before 5 p.m. today.

The day was shorter than the first two days of the litigation portion of the trial, it had been a long one for the jury and for LaValley’s family and friends.

Right out of the gate this morning, Emanuel temporarily suspended court after reports that two jurors became ill. The jurors were transported to a local doctor where they were evaluated.

Court staff, attorneys, as well as family, friends, observers and media waited throughout the morning for court to resume, but at 11:30, one of the prosecutors announced court would be recessed until 1 p.m. while the jury ate lunch.

When court resumed at 1 p.m., the courtroom was cleared while the judge and attorneys for both sides discussed the status of the jury members. When court was called back into session a half-hour later and the jury filed in, one of the jurors – a white female – had been replaced by a black female, one of the four alternate jurors selected earlier this week in Baton Rouge.

Traylor is now expected to testify today (11/17/19), when court resumes at noon.


UPDATE: SHREVEPORT, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – (11/13/19) After more than four years of delays, the capital murder trial of the man accused in the August 2015 death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley is officially set to begin Thursday morning, according to Caddo Parish Clerk of Court Mike Spence.

Grover Cannon, 31, is charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Officer LaValley as he responded to a domestic disturbance call in the 3500 block of Del Rio Street in the Queensborough neighborhood.

This will be the third trial date this year for Cannon. The first was scrapped on the day it was set to begin in January, after a motion for a change of venue for jury selection due was filed by defense attorneys due to publicity following shooting the death of SPD Officer Chatéri Payne, just five days before Cannon’s trial was set to kick off .

In that motion, Cannon’s lawyers claimed vast media coverage of Payne’s death would prejudice a local jury against Cannon, and on Feb. 19, 2019, presiding Judge Ramona Emmanuel signed an order upholding the motion.

The 19th Judicial District Court stepped up and volunteered to provide the venue for jury selection.

But, jury selection was halted three weeks into the second trial, which began on March 25 in Baton Rouge, after the Louisiana Supreme Court upheld a defense motion claiming jury selection was unfair because people aged 18-to-26 were not in the jury pool.

Baton Rouge resolved the jury issue, and on Oct. 17, 2019, a new round of jury selection commenced in the 19th Judicial District Court in Baton Rouge.

On Tuesday, selection of 12 jurors and four alternate jurors was completed. They were sworn in on Wednesday morning, placed under the rules of sequestration in Baton Rouge, and are now being transported by bus to Caddo Parish for the duration of the trial.

The litigation portion of the trial will begin at 9:30 a.m. Thursday in Caddo Parish Court, exactly four weeks from the day jury selection began.

Cannon faces the death penalty if convicted.


ORIGINAL STORY: CADDO PARISH, La. (KTAL/KMSS) – Yet another new trial date has been set for accused cop killer Grover Cannon.

Cannon is accused in the August 5, 2015, death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley. (Source: LaValley family)

Cannon is accused in the August 5, 2015, death of Shreveport Police Officer Thomas LaValley, who was responding to a suspicious person call in the Queensborough neighborhood.

Jury selection will begin on October 17 in Baton Rouge, unless another trial currently scheduled for September 17 in Baton Rouge moves forward.

In that case, Cannon’s trial would not begin until November 7.

This will be the third trial date this year for Cannon. The first was scrapped on the day it was set to begin in January after a change of venue for jury selection was ordered due to pre-trial publicity.

Jury selection was halted three weeks into the second trial, which began on March 25 in Baton Rouge, after the Louisiana Supreme Court upheld a defense motion claiming jury selection was unfair because people aged 18-to-26 were not in the jury pool.

Jury selection will once again be held in Baton Rouge, after the state supreme court overruled a defense motion granted by trial Judge Ramona Emanuel on May 10 to bring jury selection back to Caddo Parish.

Once a jury is selected, the trial will be held in Caddo Parish.

Read the original story here.

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