Markers honor locations vital to Louisiana civil rights

Louisiana News

FILE – In this Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015 file photo, Leah Chase speaks during an interview at her family’s restaurant, Dooky Chase’s, in New Orleans. The restaurant, which served as a safe meeting space for civil rights activists to strategize, is the site of the first marker to go up on the Louisiana Civil Rights Trail on Monday, May 3, 2021. Chase died in 2019 but her family still owns and operates the restaurant, whose walls are graced by an extensive collection of works by African American artists. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The New Orleans restaurant, Dooky Chase’s, served as a safe meeting space for civil rights strategy sessions.

Now it’s the site of the first marker to go up on the Louisiana Civil Rights Trail. A 6-foot-tall steel silhouette of a figure carrying a protest sign was unveiled Monday outside the restaurant.

It is the first of what will eventually be 15 markers on the Trail. They’re being installed by the Louisiana Office of Tourism to honor the struggle for equal rights by Black Louisianans.

Activist and restaurateur Leah Chase was called the “Queen of Creole Cuisine.” She died in 2019.

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