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"Wacky-Wave Clouds" Explained

<br><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font><font size="3"><font face="Calibri">Did you see any of these clouds this weekend? Lisa Towns snapped this picture of KHI clouds (Kelvin-Helmholtz billows) in Ruston Saturday evening. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></font></font><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="3"><font face="Calibri">Think of these clouds as "eddies" or "waves" in the sky. They form when two layers of air are moving at different speeds. They top layer is moving faster than the lower layer. We had a very turbulent atmosphere on Saturday which easily formed the "Kelvin-Helmholtz Wave Clouds."<o:p></o:p></font></font></p><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font>

Did you see any of these clouds this weekend? Lisa Towns snapped this picture of KHI clouds (Kelvin-Helmholtz billows) in Ruston Saturday evening.

Think of these clouds as "eddies" or "waves" in the sky. They form when two layers of air are moving at different speeds. They top layer is moving faster than the lower layer. We had a very turbulent atmosphere on Saturday which easily formed the "Kelvin-Helmholtz Wave Clouds."

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