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Hundreds of Area Students Compete in Social Studies Fair

Hundreds of students from ten school districts compete in the Social Studies Fair at ULM.
Nalin Chambliss, a 6th grader from Woodlawn Jr. High School, shows his project on how the telegraph changed the world. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Nalin Chambliss, a 6th grader from Woodlawn Jr. High School, shows his project on how the telegraph changed the world. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
 (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
(Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Kensley Hill, a 5th grader from Columbia Elementary, wore a traditional kimono and brought in real Japanese currency and candy to explain how different the Japanese culture is from America. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Kensley Hill, a 5th grader from Columbia Elementary, wore a traditional kimono and brought in real Japanese currency and candy to explain how different the Japanese culture is from America. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
 (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
(Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Giana Karstendiek, a 5th grader at Swartz upper elementary, did a project on the incredible life of Helen Keller. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Giana Karstendiek, a 5th grader at Swartz upper elementary, did a project on the incredible life of Helen Keller. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
 (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
(Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Holton Wood, a 4th grader at Holly Ridge Elementary. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
Holton Wood, a 4th grader at Holly Ridge Elementary. (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
 (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
(Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
 (Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
(Alanna Quillen, KTVE/KARD)
MONROE -- Hundreds of students put their social studies skills to the test at the 48th annual Region III Social Studies Fair.

The fair will brought in nearly 400 students from fourth to 12th-grade in ten different school districts.  

The fair was divided into three divisions. Division I is open to fourth and fifth-grade students, Division II is open to sixth and eighth-grade students, and Division III is open to ninth through 12th-grade students. 

"Anybody who's worried about the future ought to come out to the social studies fair, and you will be amazed at how creative, how much research, how knowledgable these young people are about topics that are way beyond my ability," said Dr. John Sutherlin, ULM Political Science Professor. "There was one earlier on telephones, and telegraphs, one on bees and money, they're just extraordinary, it says a lot for our area how extraordinary these people are."

Students had a wide variety of projects, from topics addressing the violence of video games, the culture of Japan, and the trapping of animals to projects exploring the haunts of Myrtles Plantation or the life of Helen Keller.

Bo Hatten, a 5th grader at Woodlawn wore his hunting attire complete with a coonskin cap for the presentation on trapping animals. He said his project fits in with his love for hunting.

"I really like it, it gets me nervous, gets me wound up, and stuff," said Hatten, who hopes he did well in the competition.

Top prize gets a scholarship for $1,000 to ULM. The top two projects will go on to compete at the state-level competition in Lake Charles.


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