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Gubernatorial Candidate Speaks on Future of the State

Republican Senator David Vitter, who will be running for governor in 2015, stopped multiple times across the area talking about where the state needs to go to fix its most important issues.

MONROE, BASTROP -- Republican Senator David Vitter, who will be running for governor in 2015, stopped multiple times across the area talking about where the state needs to go to fix its most important issues.
 
At a Monroe Chamber of Commerce Luncehon on Tuesday, Vitter spoke before a crowd of community leaders, saying long-term solutions are needed to strengthen infrastructure.

"It's one short-term fix after another. It creates maximum uncertainty, maximum instability. Businesses, job creators, can't plan on anything on the horizon," said VItter, (R) Louisiana.

Long-term solutions is good news for chamber of commerce directors, who said intervention is needed on the state and federal level to help businesses here at home.

"To do infrastructure projects these days, because they're so expensive, generally takes a blend of local, state and federal funds," said Monroe Chamber of Commerce CEO and President, Sue Nicholson.

As far as state budget cuts to higher education in the last year, Vitter said the entire state budget and taxing system needs reform.

"Budget and tax reform to create a more stable situation year-to-year and not dramatic cuts and threats," he said.

According to Vitter, that reform can come from simplifying state taxes.

"Reduce the number of complicated exemptions and deductions in credit and use that to be able to lower rates, spur more growth, spur more revenue," he added.

At a Tuesday town hall meeting in Bastrop, Vitter also said more needs to be done to help students wanting trade skills.

"We need to have the right balance and catch those kids in high school who don't want to go to college, but who want to get a trade," he said.

Since the Sportsman's Paradise relies heavily on agriculture, Vitter also said he will fight too many EPA regulations in the Bayou State.

"That's going to dramatically expand EPA's overregulation into all of our lives," he said. "It's going to have a big, big, negative impact on ag in particular."

Vitter said he is ready to lead as he gears up for his campaign for governor.





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