First Blind Adventurer

First Blind Adventurer

Erik Weihenmayer, the first blind person to climb Mount Everest, is launching a national Non-24-Hour Disorder campaign to help people who are totally blind.
FIRST BLIND ADVENTURER TO CLIMB MT. EVEREST, ERIK WEIHENMAYER, EMBARKS ON JOURNEY TO BRING AWARENESS TO NON-24-HOUR DISORDER

ERIK WEIHENMAYER LAUNCHES NATIONAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGN TO HELP 80,000 PEOPLE WHO ARE TOTALLY BLIND LIVING WITH NON-24

Erik Weihenmayer, the first blind person to climb Mount Everest, is launching a national Non-24-Hour Disorder campaign and expert podcast series to help people who are totally blind who may be living with Non-24 symptoms. In partnership with Vanda Pharmaceuticals, the podcast series features insights from physicians, life coaches and people living with Non-24, who provide helpful information on the disorder, as well as tips for managing symptoms, maximizing productivity and maintaining healthy relationships.

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT:

·Non-24 is a serious, chronic circadian rhythm disorder that affects as many as 70 percent of people who are totally blind.

Erik Weihenmayer is the first blind person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, on May 25, 2001. He also climbed Mount Ararat and completed the Seven Summits in 2008. He is the author of Touch the Top of the World: A Blind Man's Journey to Climb Farther Than the Eye can See, his autobiography. Erik's motivational speaking career has taken him around the world from Hong Kong to Switzerland, from Thailand to the 2005 APEC Summit in Chile. Erik has shared the speaking platform with notables like Al Gore, Tony Blair and Mayor Rudy Giuliani, among others.

·Non-24 has a debilitating impact on health, disrupts daily living and can influence the ability to function.

·People with Non-24 find it hard to go to sleep when they want, often experiencing nighttime sleeplessness and daytime sleepiness. This can impact productivity at work, personal relationships and overall functionality.


Dr. Michael Thorpy is Director of the Sleep-Wake Disorders Center at the

Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Dr. Thorpy also serves as Professor of Neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. In addition, He has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles on narcolepsy, insomnia and sleep disorders, including publications in journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine. In 1993, Dr. Thorpy was awarded The Nathaniel Kleitman Award from the American Sleep Disorders Association, one of the field’s highest honors. Dr. Thorpy is available to provide an overview of Non-24 Hour Disorder and discuss how circadian rhythm disorders impact bodily functions.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus