70°F
NoTxt.jpg

How mobile devices effect driving


As the number of smart phones continue to grow, so do the reasons why consumers use their phones. Although the feature sets continue to expand with each new smart phone release, the primary use of smart phones in today's society is "texting."
With the emergence of smart phones as primary communication tools, it brings with it significant safety concerns. Texting and driving has quickly become one of the primary causes of automobile accidents in the US. 28% of all traffic accidents are caused by drivers talking on their cell phones and/or sending text messages. This 28% accounts for roughly 1.4 million crashes and of the number, 200,000 crashes can be blamed on text messaging.
Statistics show an individual's reaction time decreases to that of a 70-year-old if they are texting or talking while driving. More than 81% of the nation's population admits to texting while driving and, on top of this, more then 56% are teenagers.

Teen Distracted Driving Statistics


Teen Driver Cell Phone and Texting Statistics
Despite the risks, the majority of teen drivers ignore cell phone driving restrictions.

Talking on a cell phone while driving can make a young driver's reaction time as slow as that of a 70-year-old.

56% of teenagers admit to talking on their cell phones behind the wheel, while 13% admit to texting while driving. (Note: Because this information was given voluntarily by teens, actual cell phone use numbers may be much higher.)

48% of young Americans ages 12-17 say they've been in a car while the driver was texting.

52% of 16- and 17-year-old teen drivers confess to making and answering cell phone calls on the road. 34% admit to text messaging while driving.

Over 60% of American teens admit to risky driving, and nearly half of those that admit to risky driving also admit to text messaging behind the wheel.

Each year, 21% of fatal car crashes involving teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19 were the result of cell phone usage. This result has been expected to grow as much as 4% every year.

Almost 50% of all drivers between the ages of 18 and 24 are texting while driving.

Over one-third of all young drivers, ages 24 and under, are texting on the road.

Teens say that texting is their number one driver distraction.